Posted On:email inbox Archives - Emailexplained.com

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Email Client

March 19, 2014 - By 

An email client is a software which enables users to interact with email messages. It is also called an email reader or Mail User Agent (MUA). A user can configure one or more email addresses on the email client and use it as a central interface to handle receiving, composing, and sending emails conveniently. An email client can be web-based, like Gmail or Yahoo, or it can be a desktop email client like Microsoft Outlook.

For an email client to function, the user has to configure an email address on it. This involves specifying the email address itself, the Post Office Protocol (POP), Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP), the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) address, email aliases, port number, and other necessary settings.

The email client retrieves new messages from the service provider’s hosted and managed mailbox at intervals set by the user, or whenever the user manually commands it. Receipt of the emails takes place through the mail transfer agent (MTA) of the email service provider. Sending messages, on the other hand, utilises the Mail Submission Agent (MSA) to deliver messages to the destination email address via the service provider’s server.

Not only can email clients handle multiple addresses, but they can also be configured with addresses from different service providers like Microsoft, Gmail, Yahoo, etc.


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Inbox

March 12, 2014 - By 

An email inbox is a folder in which all incoming messages are received and stored by default. This applies to webmail interfaces or desktop email clients like Outlook. Storage-wise, there are two types of inboxes. You can use a POP3 account on an email client in which case the emails can be retrieved and stored on the hard drive, or you can use an Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) mail server in which case your inbox will be on the mail server.

Having the messages on your hard drive has the advantage of accessing old emails even without an internet connection. On the other hand, you need an active connection to access even your old mail on an IMAP mail server.

The inbox is only meant to be a receiving and sorting folder and keeping all your messages in it is misuse. If you receive a lot of business and casual mail, it becomes difficult to wade through the swamp of unread relevant and irrelevant mail. For this reason, it is prudent to have separate folders for business, friends’ and family emails. Upon reading a message, push it into its designated folder. Failure to do this may result in what is called ’email bankruptcy’, where you decide to delete all mail regardless of the sender just so you can start afresh.

 

 


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Recipient

March 19, 2014 - By 

RECIPIENT

A recipient is the one to whom an e-mail is being sent. He is the receiver of the e-mail. There can be single or multiple recipients of an e-mail. Whenever an e-mail is sent, the e-mail address of the recipient is written in the “To” field of the mail. Without a recipient a mail cannot be sent. The web address must be correctly written so as to ensure proper delivery of the mail message.

There are three kinds of recipients in all. The recipients in the ‘To’  field are the primary ones, CC field recipients are others, to whom the author wishes to inform the message publicly and the bcc field recipients are those who are surreptitiously being informed.

The target address must be valid else the message stands rejected. A recipient must be added in the contacts and the list must be maintained carefully by the senders. The recipient will receive the  message in the inbox folder only if the sender is authorized and is not using spam. The e-mail address of the recipient can also be saved by the name of that person in the contact list.


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SPF (Sender Policy Framework)

March 12, 2014 - By 

SPF (Sender Policy Framework)

Sender Policy Framework (SPF) is an e-mail validation system designed for preventing e-mail spam by detecting e-mail spoofing, a common vulnerability and threat by verifying the sender’s IP addresses. SPF allows the administrators to specify the hosts which are allowed to send mail from a given domain by creating a particular SPF record in the Domain Name System. Mail exchangers use the DNS for checking that whether the mail from a given record domain is being sent by a host sanctioned from that particular domain’s administrators.

When a domain publishes an SPF record, spammers are less likely to forge e-mails pretending to be from that domain and the reason for this being that the forged e-mails are more likely to be caught by the spam filters which continuously check the SPF record.

Hence, an SPF protected domain is much less attractive to the spammers. Because of SPF protected domain is less attractive as being a spoofed address, it is less likely to get blacklisted by the spam filters and so the e-mail being sent is more likely to get through.